Posts Tagged Rochester Electronics

Intersil Hip0081 Devices Are Recreated

Posted by on Saturday, 21 August, 2010


– Rochester Electronics, the world’s largest authorized manufacturer and distributor of end-of-life and mature semiconductors, has re-created the Intersil Corporation (formerly of Harris Corporation) avionics-level HIP0081 quad-inverting power drives with serial diagnostic interface devices. Rochester’s Semiconductor Replication ProcessTM (SRPTM) guarantees that the Rochester-manufactured parts exactly match the form, fit, and function of the originals. With full permission from Intersil, Rochester is now the authorized continuing source for the part. For many equipment manufacturers who use this part, availability from Rochester has eliminated the need for system re-designs, saving them each millions of dollars in related re-design costs.

Rochester’s sophisticated SRP combines archive identification, tear down of sample product, process match, source-to-target comparison, detailed SPICE analysis, and testing to the original manufacturer’s specifications and beyond, to generate an exact replica of the original device. Rochester re-created the HIP0081 devices from just a few samples using these advanced reverse-engineering techniques. To re-create the HIP0081 and match the performance of the original device, Rochester engineers fabricated wafers using a combination of processes from two wafer foundries. In addition, the HIP0081 package had also reached end-of-life, so Rochester re-created the device package to house the replicated die and chip, providing a complete solution.

“Semiconductor re-creation and continuing manufacturing is a cost-effective and time-saving alternative to system re-design when critical semiconductors are no longer available,” said Paul Gerrish, co-president at Rochester Electronics. “In our Semiconductor Replication Process, our engineers use complex reverse-engineering techniques to re-create the device and provide a replacement that matches the original semiconductor’s physical features, layerby-layer and pin-for-pin, and is guaranteed to perform exactly as the original.”

Ideal for aviation, automotive, industrial, and robotic applications, the HIP0081 quad power drivers contain four individually protected NDMOS power output transistor switches to drive inductive and resistive loads such as relays, solenoids, injectors, AC and DC motors, heaters, and incandescent lamp displays. The four power drivers are low-side switches driven by CMOS logic input control stages. Each output power driver is protected against over-current, over-temperature and over-voltage. An internal drain-to-gate zener diode provides the clamping protection for over-voltage. Diagnostic circuits provide ground short, supply short, open load, and thermal overload detection for each of the four output stages. Each of the four input drivers and their respective diagnostic filters is controlled by one enable input. Further, the inputs are CMOS logic compatible, and individually control the output drives with active high state for turn-on. Filters are used on the output of the fault sensing comparators to prevent the detection of short-duration transient spikes.

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Rochester Electronics Offers Expanded Space-level Semiconductor Manufacturing Service

Posted by on Monday, 26 July, 2010


– Rochester Electronics, the world’s largest authorized manufacturer and distributor of end-of-life and mature semiconductors, has expanded its space-level continuing manufacturing services and product offering to provide a continuous, long-term source of certified semiconductor devices. Since many manufacturers are discontinuing production of space-level parts due to the rigorous certification processes and expansive infrastructure required to manufacture, test, and store these low-volume parts, customers are often left with few places to turn for authorized space-level solutions. Contractually licensed by more than 60 original manufacturers, Rochester currently has more than two million space-level semiconductor devices in stock. In addition to the space-level finished goods inventory, Rochester is licensed to continuously manufacture space products from such manufacturers as National, Texas Instruments, Fairchild, and others.

Rochester’s combination of semiconductor re-creation and continuing manufacturing is a cost-effective and time-saving alternative to system re-design when critical semiconductors are no longer available from the original manufacturer. Rochester’s advanced re-creation process provides customers with a replicated device that matches the original semiconductor’s physical features, layer-by-layer and pin-for-pin, and is guaranteed to perform exactly as the original.

As an approved member of the Class V Qualified Manufacturer List (QML) by the Defense Supply Center of Columbus (DSCC), Rochester manufactures devices that meet MIL-PRF-38535 space-level certification requirements. This certification verifies Rochester Electronics’ capabilities in manufacturing processes, materials, and highly defined test flow to ensure the production of reliable parts that are electrically stable and can withstand harsh environmental stresses.

“Our unique Semiconductor Replication Process (SRP) guarantees that replicated devices perform as effectively as the original semiconductor devices. Rochester has successfully completed 83 semiconductor replication projects in the last 18 months and is currently engaged in more than 30 additional re-creation projects,” said Paul Gerrish, co-president of Rochester Electronics. “In addition, we also maintain a large inventory of space-level parts to keep lead times as short as possible.”

Rochester Electronics’ space-level certification and manufacturing capabilities enable the company to provide continuing long-term support for military and aerospace programs. For example, Rochester is current providing continuing support for a part used in the James Webb Space Telescope (next-generation Hubble Space Telescope), a large, infrared-optimized space telescope that is set to be launched in 2013. The semiconductor, which reached end-of-life, and for which there was no next-generation replacement, is built on a robust, high-powered, bipolar process and contains a fairly unique functional set that includes a high-power transistor array with front-end logic blocks. It is space-proven and thus has the unique radiation-reflective, rad-hard qualities. Rochester’s ability to support the part prevented a system re-design, which would have created a dramatic design challenge in terms of cost, time, and feasibility, including, possibly, years of re-testing and re-certification.

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